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New ‘droughty’ soils model for Pacific Northwest could aid forest health in changing climate

Scientists have developed a new approach to modeling potentially drought-prone soils in Pacific Northwest forests, which could aid natural resource managers to prepare forested landscapes for a changing climate.

Chris Branam | Aug 16, 2018 | News Story

Tillage Method and Sowing Rate Relations for Dryland Spring Wheat, Barley, and Oat

Some farmers in the Inland Pacific Northwest have reported lower grain yield of spring cereals with no-till (NT) compared to conservation tillage (CT). A 4-year field study was conducted in a 12-inch annual precipitation zone to determine tillage method and sowing rate effects on seed-zone water, seed-zone temperature, plant stand, grain yield, grain yield components, and straw production for three spring-sown cereal species.

William Schillinger, Donald Wellsandt, Harry Schafer, Steve Schofstoll, Robert Papendick | Nov 2005 | Publication

Dry Farming Oregon

Oregon State University is known for its College of Agricultural Sciences. The school offers 25 Major and Minor options that include but are not limited to Botany, Animal Sciences, and even Fermentation Sciences for you beer lovers out there. The OSU Extension Service Small Farms Program is one of many things that go on out there and is nestled in the heart of ...

Jan 2017 | Article

Drought hits Douglas-fir trees hard

Diseases and pests take advantage of trees' weakened condition

Mary Stewart | May 29, 2015 | News Story

Why Does Your Tree Look Sick?

Most “sick tree” problems can be traced back to underlying stresses that have reduced the tree's vigor, making it more vulnerable to diseases or insect pests.

Jun 2018 | Article

Living with Droughty Pastures

At times we see many of our cool-season perennial and annual forages looking stressed and growing very slow as they struggle with heat and no rain. The hot, dry conditions we sometimes experience in western Oregon have many pasture and hayground managers thinking about forages that can be productive under these circumstances. Fortunately, there are some strategies to consider ...

Shelby Filley | Aug 2019 | Article

Stressed trees show dieback

Browning or dieback is usually caused by weather-related stress, sometimes in combination with pests and diseases.

Mar 2018 | Article

Drought Advisory: Managing Pastures and Haylands

Drought, an environmental stress with periods of limited or no water during the growing season, reduces forage production for grazing and haymaking. Prolonged drought forces livestock and hay producers to better manage their fields to maximize recovery after the drought ends. Forage produced during a drought may be stressed enough that livestock risk death by simply eating it. The...

Steve Fransen, Justen Smith, and Sarah Smith | Sep 2019 | Article

Why are my trees dying?

Trees all over Oregon are displaying signs of poor health. People are quick to blame insects, but insects are rarely the underlying cause of the problem. Drought and other stressors can make trees vulnerable to pests and disease.

John Punches | Sep 2019 | Article

Dry Farming Collaborative: Innovating and adapting to a changing climate

In response to escalating concerns about climate change, drought, and reduced summer water availability, the OSU Small Farms Program launched the Dry Farming Project in 2014 with support from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program. The project started small with a few case studies and demonstrations, and has had a ...

Amy Garrett | Oct 2017 | Article