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New ‘droughty’ soils model for Pacific Northwest could aid forest health in changing climate

Scientists have developed a new approach to modeling potentially drought-prone soils in Pacific Northwest forests, which could aid natural resource managers to prepare forested landscapes for a changing climate.

Chris Branam | Aug 16, 2018 | News Story

Checklist for putting your garden to bed for winter

The glistening cold of the Willamette Valley's first frost has ushered in the right time to clean up the garden.

Nov 8, 2013 | News Story

Noble fir seedling survival strategies

Applied research to increase survival of noble fir Christmas tree seedlings during drought years, North Willamette Research and Extension Center.

Judy Kowalski, Chal Landgren | Jan 2020 | Article

Eat from the garden all year

Cloches allow you to eat fresh out of the garden all year.

Mar 31, 2011 | News Story

Drought hits Douglas-fir trees hard

Diseases and pests take advantage of trees' weakened condition

Mary Stewart | May 29, 2015 | News Story

I am furloughed, too early for gardening?

Q: I'm a furloughed federal employee and suddenly find myself with free time that could end tomorrow, next week, next month, who knows. On top of that, it's sunny! What are things I could do now that will be a good ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

These cold-hardy vegetables may stick it out through winter

The fearless gardener still has a chance to plant some cold-hardy vegetables to harvest next spring, said Jim Myers, plant breeder and researcher at Oregon State University. But don't dawdle.

Sep 13, 2013 | News Story

Take one more go at the garden before retiring for winter

There's plenty to do, including clean up and tool care

Kym Pokorny | Nov 22, 2017 | News Story

Lengthen growing season by building a coldframe or cloche

Construction materials can include fiberglass, wood, wire, plastic and PVC hoops.

Tiffany Woods | Jun 27, 2014 | News Story

Why Does Your Tree Look Sick?

Most “sick tree” problems can be traced back to underlying stresses that have reduced the tree's vigor, making it more vulnerable to diseases or insect pests.

Jun 2018 | Article