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Tillage Method and Sowing Rate Relations for Dryland Spring Wheat, Barley, and Oat

Some farmers in the Inland Pacific Northwest have reported lower grain yield of spring cereals with no-till (NT) compared to conservation tillage (CT). A 4-year field study was conducted in a 12-inch annual precipitation zone to...

William Schillinger, Donald Wellsandt, Harry Schafer, Steve Schofstoll, Robert Papendick | Nov 2005 | Publication

Using soil type to estimate potential forage productivity

Knowing yield can help you make informed management decisions. You can estimate potential yield from past history of the field, neighboring fields of similar type, averages for specific forages, and from soils information.

Shelby Filley | Aug 2018 | Article

Dry Farming Oregon

Oregon State University is known for its College of Agricultural Sciences. The school offers 25 Major and Minor options that include but are not limited to Botany, Animal Sciences, and even Fermentation Sciences for you beer ...

Jan 2017 | Article

Are madrone trees mean?

Q: I have a small grove of Madrones behind my house. I have put a couple of annual beds under them but nothing seems to grow under them. I have looked all over the net to no avail on this issue. I did amend the ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Native madrones are special to the Northwest

There are probably few plants that are more strongly identified with this area or are held in greater affection than the madrone tree.

Jan 27, 2006 | News Story

Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article

What’s Wrong With My Madrone?

This article briefly discusses the most prevalent madrone disease problems, then offers a broader perspective on the health of this southern Oregon native.

Max Bennett, Dave Shaw | Nov 2006 | Article

Dry Farming Collaborative: Adapting to a Changing Climate

The Dry Farming Collaborative is helping farmers learn how use less irrigation water to raise vegetables in western Oregon.

Amy Garrett | Oct 2017 | Article