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Rhododendrons and azaleas need a strong acidic soil

Check out yellow leaves on rhododendrons and azaleas.

Jun 4, 2010 | News Story

Tillage Method and Sowing Rate Relations for Dryland Spring Wheat, Barley, and Oat

Some farmers in the Inland Pacific Northwest have reported lower grain yield of spring cereals with no-till (NT) compared to conservation tillage (CT). A 4-year field study was conducted in a 12-inch annual precipitation zone to determine tillage method and sowing rate effects on seed-zone water, seed-zone temperature, plant stand, grain yield, grain yield components, and straw production for three spring-sown cereal species.

William Schillinger, Donald Wellsandt, Harry Schafer, Steve Schofstoll, Robert Papendick | Nov 2005 | Publication

Trees and Shrubs for Erosion Control

A list of recommended trees and shrubs in Oregon, good for controlling erosion.

Jul 2018 | Collection

Dry Farming Oregon

Oregon State University is known for its College of Agricultural Sciences. The school offers 25 Major and Minor options that include but are not limited to Botany, Animal Sciences, and even Fermentation Sciences for you beer lovers out there. The OSU Extension Service Small Farms Program is one of many things that go on out there and is nestled in the heart of ...

Jan 2017 | Article

Plant native Oregon shrubs now

Time to plant native Oregon shrubs

Jan 29, 2010 | News Story

Give rhododendrons and azaleas an annual check-up each spring

Spring is time to care for rhodies.

Peg Herring | Mar 25, 2005 | News Story

Growing berries, fruit trees, roses and native plants in Central Oregon

OSU Extension publications show how to grow several kinds of berries, fruit trees, roses and native plants in Central Oregon.

Jan 9, 2009 | News Story

Arborvitae root issues, should we dig it?

Q: We planted 17 emerald arborvitaes 3 weeks ago. We broke apart the rootball (at the suggestion of an employee at the retailer) and I've since learned that this is bad to do. We are watering regularly and have covered the area with mulch to retain moisture but our trees seem to be yellowing slightly. What can we do to encourage survival? I'm worried we may have shocked them too much. Any type of fertilizer we can use to encourage root growth/provide nutrients?

A: View answer | View all featured questions

OSU trial shows Ceanothus blooms profusely with little care

Wild lilac is drought tolerant and needs no fertilizer

Kym Pokorny | May 8, 2015 | News Story

Streamside planting zones

Describes the three planting zones around a stream.

Jul 2018 | Article