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Showing 1 - 10 of 11 results.

Red worms eat their way through kitchen waste to produce rich soil amendment

Keeping a worm farm is an easy project

Kym Pokorny | Aug 12, 2016 | News Story

Wiggle your way into worm composting

Worm castings -- AKA poop -- add valuable nutrients to the soil and is easy to make. The hardest part is making the bin and that's not difficult.

Kym Pokorny | Jul 23, 2018 | News Story

Estimating Nitrogen & Dry Matter From Cover Crops

Cover crops are used by many farmers, but very few know how much nitrogen (N) or dry matter they are getting from their cover crops. There are some methods in the literature for estimating cover crop contributions. We are ...

Nick Andrews | Apr 2007 | Article

Yesterday's Orchard, Today's Home: Legacy Pesticides on Former Orchards

Residues of lead arsenate, DDT, and other persistent pesticides may be in soil where orchards once grew and homes now stand. This report discusses how to investigate former pesticide use and current pesticide residues on your ...

Dave Stone, Kim Anderson | Mar 2009 | OSU Extension Catalog

I gotta have more worms!

Q: Where can I find information on adding worms to soil that has none? Thanks.

A: View answer | View all featured questions

What should I be doing now for weed control?

Q: The straw mulch I used at the end of summer to suppress the weeds doesn't seem to be working. Should I till it and cover with plastic? black or clear? Is there something better. Or should I add more straw. I could probably bring some cardboard home from work. Is this a healthy option?

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Living with termites in Bend!

Q: I am trying to assess whether my exterminator is giving me accurate information about termite activity in Central Oregon. I am a new home owner of a house built in 1936. Termite activity was discovered during inspection and ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Composting with worms

Information about how to use worms to compost.

Dec 2017 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article

How to Remove Poison Oak Plants and Treat a Rash

Poison oak plants contain a chemical that causes a severe rash. Learn how to spot a plant, safely remove, and clean your clothes, gear and skin afterward to prevent a rash.

Jun 2010 | Article