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Burkholderia bacteria -- good, bad or both?

A species of bacterium common in soil and water called "Burkholderia cepacia" (B. cepacia) is being championed by agricultural scientists as a non-chemical means of fighting plant infections.

Feb 19, 2003 | News Story

Agronomic Guidelines for Flexible Cropping Systems in Dryland Areas of Oregon

Plant-available soil water is the most reliable indicator of potential yield and is the basis of guidelines found in this publication.

Don Wysocki, Larry Lutcher, Mary Corp | Nov 2009 | OSU Extension Catalog

Dry Farming Project Continues to Expand

Dryland farming research efforts will examine prospects for growers in the Pacific Northwest.

Amy Garrett | Jul 2018 | Article

Agronomic Zones of the Dryland Pacific Northwest

With an annual wheat harvest valued at $2.1 billion, producers in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington know the value of farming practices adapted to each region, county, and field. Researchers mapped precipitation, soil depth, and ...

Don Wysocki, Christina Hagerty | Mar 2019 | OSU Extension Catalog

Advances in Dryland Farming in the Inland Pacific Northwest

Farmers make tough decisions all the time—it comes with the territory. When that territory includes the dryland region of the inland Pacific Northwest, decisions can be even more challenging. Fluctuating weather, varying soils, and...

Don Wysocki, Clark Seavert, Silvia I. Rondon, Stephen Machado, Susan Capalbo, Rakesh Awale | Jul 2017 | OSU Extension Catalog

Pythium

This pest stunts the growth and maturation or cereal grains.

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Cephalosporium Stripe

Winter cereals and grasses in danger of contracting disease.

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Take All

This root rot look-alike is endangering wheat, grass, and barley. Learn the signs, symptoms, and controls of this disease.

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Blueberry bacterial and fungal diseases

Pacific Northwest blueberry growers must identify and control a number of bacterial and fungal diseases in order to ensure the highest yields. Fortunately, only a few of the diseases that occur on highbush blueberry in this region cause significant losses when left unchecked.

Jay Pscheidt, Jerry Weiland | Mar 2015 | Article