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Agronomic Guidelines for Flexible Cropping Systems in Dryland Areas of Oregon

Plant-available soil water is the most reliable indicator of potential yield and is the basis of guidelines found in this publication.

Don Wysocki, Larry Lutcher, Mary Corp | Nov 2009 | OSU Extension Catalog

Dry Farming Project Continues to Expand

Dryland farming research efforts will examine prospects for growers in the Pacific Northwest.

Amy Garrett | Jul 2018 | Article

Agronomic Zones of the Dryland Pacific Northwest

With an annual wheat harvest valued at $2.1 billion, producers in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington know the value of farming practices adapted to each region, county, and field. Researchers mapped precipitation, soil depth, and ...

Don Wysocki, Christina Hagerty | Mar 2019 | OSU Extension Catalog

Advances in Dryland Farming in the Inland Pacific Northwest

Farmers make tough decisions all the time—it comes with the territory. When that territory includes the dryland region of the inland Pacific Northwest, decisions can be even more challenging. Fluctuating weather, varying soils, and...

Don Wysocki, Clark Seavert, Silvia I. Rondon, Stephen Machado, Susan Capalbo, Rakesh Awale | Jul 2017 | OSU Extension Catalog

Is English ivy REALLY invasive?

Q: I realize ivy is considered an invasive plant, however, we like it and are using it for erosion control. We recently planted cuttings with the help of root hormone powder. My question: is this an okay time to have planted this so that it can thrive?

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Take All

This root rot look-alike is endangering wheat, grass, and barley. Learn the signs, symptoms, and controls of this disease.

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Sawflies

Will Oregon meet these wasp-like pests again?

Mary Corp | May 2003 | Article

Scouting and collecting Wheat Head Armyworms

What growers can do to scout for and help identify wheathead armyworms.

Mary Corp | Oct 2008 | Article

Western Oregon Hay

Because of our typically wet springs in western Oregon, the average hay crop usually ends up being of low quality. However, when forage in the field is young and tender it is of high quality. As the forage matures, it ...

Shelby Filley | May 2013 | Article