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Growing Berries on the Oregon Coast: Strawberries

Information on growing strawberries on the Oregon Coast, including site selection, soil, cultivars, planting systems, irrigation, mulching, fertilization, harvesting, renovation, and handling pests and problems.

Bernadine Strik, Cassie Bouska | Mar 2018 | OSU Extension Catalog

Growing Strawberries in Your Home Garden

Describes various varieties of June-bearing, everbearing, and day-neutral strawberries and when they produce crops. Explains where to plant strawberries and how to rotate a strawberry patch to optimize growth and minimize disease. ...

Bernadine Strik | Mar 2013 | OSU Extension Catalog

Plant strawberries in early spring

Early spring is the time to plant strawberries.

Apr 3, 2009 | News Story

Fresh Market Organic Strawberry Research

It’s strawberry season and even we have caught strawberry fever! The Mid-Valley Small Farms team is excited to announce that they are conducting new research on strawberry production. This Research and Extension program, supported...

Victoria Binning | May 2018 | Article

Keep those gray fuzzy strawberries in check

Proper watering and yearly renovation can help stem strawberry gray mold, also known as Botrytis fruit rot.

May 27, 2011 | News Story

Weed management for blueberry fields in the Pacific Northwest

Weeds are always a difficult problem in blueberry production! They start to show up shortly after transplanting, and tend to become more problematic as time goes on. There are, however, strategies that help to control weeds in...

Tim Miller | Mar 2015 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article

Estimated value of cranberries as a livestock feed

Value analysis of cranberries as a livestock feed in the U.S.

Amy Peters, Michael Gamroth, Art Poole | Aug 2001 | Article