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New ‘droughty’ soils model for Pacific Northwest could aid forest health in changing climate

Scientists have developed a new approach to modeling potentially drought-prone soils in Pacific Northwest forests, which could aid natural resource managers to prepare forested landscapes for a changing climate.

Chris Branam | Aug 16, 2018 | News Story

Forages - hay and pasture collection

This collection has information on soil testing and ferilizing, renovation. forage management , hay, irrigation, feeding values, forage types, forage anti-quality factors, leasing pastures and more.

Shelby Filley | Aug 2019 | Collection

Fire FAQs—What is fire severity?

Fire severity is a measure of the effects of fire on the environment—both in damage to vegetation and impacts on the soil. Fire severity is driven by weather conditions, the topography of the landscape, and the fuels that are present. Of these, weather is the overriding factor.

Dan Leavell, Lauren Grand, Stephen Fitzgerald, Carrie Berger | Oct 2018 | OSU Extension Catalog

Managing Organic Debris for Forest Health

This publication outlines the role of forest organic debris in inland Northwest forests. Recommends how to maintain forest soil productivity and improve wildlife habitat while reducing wildfire and insect-pest hazards. Tells how to ...

Mar 2009 | OSU Extension Catalog

Hey, how much hay?

Q: How many bales of grass hay per acre from the average pasture?

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Fertilizing For Hay Production

Forages and all green plants require moisture, nutrients, heat, and light for growth. To make hay, you need good nutrition to maximize on productivity and quality of the final product. You might want to treat hay fields and ...

Sam Angima | Mar 2007 | Article

How blueberry plants develop and grow

Blueberries grow well in the Pacific Northwest. To get the most out of your bushes, it helps to understand the form and function of each part of the plant.

Bernadine Strik | Mar 2015 | Article

Western Oregon Hay

Because of our typically wet springs in western Oregon, the average hay crop usually ends up being of low quality. However, when forage in the field is young and tender it is of high quality. As the forage matures, it ...

Shelby Filley | May 2013 | Article