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New ‘droughty’ soils model for Pacific Northwest could aid forest health in changing climate

Scientists have developed a new approach to modeling potentially drought-prone soils in Pacific Northwest forests, which could aid natural resource managers to prepare forested landscapes for a changing climate.

Chris Branam | Aug 16, 2018 | News Story

Fire FAQs—What is fire severity?

Fire severity is a measure of the effects of fire on the environment—both in damage to vegetation and impacts on the soil. Fire severity is driven by weather conditions, the topography of the landscape, and the fuels that are present. Of these, weather is the overriding factor.

Dan Leavell, Lauren Grand, Stephen Fitzgerald, Carrie Berger | Oct 2018 | OSU Extension Catalog

Dry Farming Oregon

Oregon State University is known for its College of Agricultural Sciences. The school offers 25 Major and Minor options that include but are not limited to Botany, Animal Sciences, and even Fermentation Sciences for you beer ...

Jan 2017 | Article

Managing Organic Debris for Forest Health

This publication outlines the role of forest organic debris in inland Northwest forests. Recommends how to maintain forest soil productivity and improve wildlife habitat while reducing wildfire and insect-pest hazards. Tells how to ...

Mar 2009 | OSU Extension Catalog

Sustainable food-buying options expand

Northwest growers adopt sustainable agriculture practices and certification.

Mar 27, 2008 | News Story

Spikeweed

Can spraying this weed at the right time keep it out of our fields?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Reflections of a SARE Fellow

The 2014-2016 cadre of SARE Fellows visited numerous farms in Arkansas, Nebraska, Idaho, and West Virginia to study sustainable agricultural practices. The Fellows themselves were from Florida, Maine, Missouri, and Washington; they ...

Susan Kerr | Oct 2017 | Article

Range improvements: tools and methods to improve cattle distribution

Uneven grazing distribution patterns on rangeland can lead to overuse of forage in some areas and no use or waste of herbage in areas not visited by cattle. Range improvements affecting more even distribution of grazing ...

David Ganskopp | Jan 2019 | Article