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Raised Bed Gardening

Gardening in raised beds has been a common practice for centuries. "Raised" means the soil level in the bed is higher than its surrounding, and "bed" implies it is small enough to work from the walkways.

May 2018 | Fact Sheet

Growing Your Own

This publication provides basic advice on a wide range of gardening topics, including composting, container gardens, fall/winter gardens, fertilizing, insect pests, plant diseases, planting guidelines, raised beds, site selection, slugs, ...

Gail Langellotto | Apr 2011 | OSU Extension Catalog

I need a cat-free garden, is there a natural deterrent?

Q: My daughter's cat digs in my flower bed and leaves holes and scatters dirt everywhere, uproots bulbs, etc. What can I use that is a natural remedy, something safe for the environment.

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Encourage kids to explore imagination in the garden

Digging in the dirt gives youth a feeling of accomplishment

Kym Pokorny | Apr 22, 2016 | News Story

Pacific NW Native Plants by Plant Community

Useful information about Western Hemlock-Douglas Fir Forest, Prairie, Scrub-Shrub Wetlands, and Mixed Deciduous Forest/Steep Dry Slope.

Lisa Albert | Jun 2014 | Article

Safe and easy tool use for the visually impaired gardener

Try to imagine using garden tools out in the garden and yard if you couldn't see well.

Feb 19, 2003 | News Story

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article

Dirty your hands and feed your brain as a Master Gardener

Volunteers give back by educating the public

Oct 6, 2017 | News Story

How to Remove Poison Oak Plants and Treat a Rash

Poison oak plants contain a chemical that causes a severe rash. Learn how to spot a plant, safely remove, and clean your clothes, gear and skin afterward to prevent a rash.

Jun 2010 | Article