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Poor soil? Build up with raised beds

Framed or mounded, raised beds give plant roots the space they need

Kym Pokorny | Nov 8, 2016 | News Story

Variety in the Pasture

Forages are a critical part of farming and ranching, and a large variety of grasses and legumes are available for planting in our fields. The more we know about these forages, the better we can choose what we grow and manage it for grazing livestock or hay production. Understanding scientific names botanists give plants can help us keep track of the different forages.

Shelby Filley | Mar 2012 | Article

Soil pH and pasture productivity

A look at the cost effectiveness of liming coastal ryegrass pastures.

Troy Downing | May 2009 | Article

Coastal Pastures in Oregon and Washington

The coastal regions of Oregon and Washington have different climate and soils than other parts of the states. Rainfall is high, ranging from 70 inches in southern Oregon to more than 100 inches in the coastal mountains. Temperature is moderated by the Pacific Ocean resulting in long seasons and mild temperatures. Astoria, Oregon, for example, averages 276 frost-free days and ...

Fred Lundin | Sep 1996 | Article

Raised Bed Gardening

Gardening in raised beds has been a common practice for centuries. "Raised" means the soil level in the bed is higher than its surrounding, and "bed" implies it is small enough to work from the walkways.

May 2018 | Fact Sheet

Raised bed lumber, pressure treated safe?

Q: I am considering using some 2x6 inch material for a small raised bed for strawberries. My first thought was to consider pressure treated lumber, but I have read conflicting articles on the the safety of this product, with the chemicals possibly reaching the plants. Others claim this doesn't happen and the lumber is safe. I would appreciate your opinion on this matter.

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Fertilizing For Hay Production

Forages and all green plants require moisture, nutrients, heat, and light for growth. To make hay, you need good nutrition to maximize on productivity and quality of the final product. You might want to treat hay fields and pasture fields differently in terms of when you apply fertilizers especially nitrogen even when soil test results are the same. To see how this works ...

Sam Angima | Mar 2007 | Article