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Management Strategies for Dealing with Select Poisonous Plants in Oregon

Rangeland, pastures and hay fields throughout Oregon often contain poisonous plants that are potentially dangerous to cattle and other livestock.

Andy Hulting, Karin Neff | Sep 2019 | Publication

Orchid Cactus - Epiphyllums

Learn about plant cuttings, water and light requirements, temperature, fertilizer, pests, and repotting.

Cal Peterson | Jan 2011 | Article

Take All

This root rot look-alike is endangering wheat, grass, and barley. Learn the signs, symptoms, and controls of this disease.

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Spikeweed

Can spraying this weed at the right time keep it out of our fields?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Homemade Remedies for Pests and Diseases

Home remedies have shown some effectiveness against many garden pests and diseases.

Jul 2017 | Article

What’s Wrong With My Madrone?

This article briefly discusses the most prevalent madrone disease problems, then offers a broader perspective on the health of this southern Oregon native.

Max Bennett, Dave Shaw | Nov 2006 | Article

Avoiding poisonous plants in pasture and hay

How to identify, manage, and avoid poisonous plants in your pasture.

Shelby Filley | Apr 2012 | Article

Monitoring Grazing Lands in Oregon

Rangeland monitoring represents a critical tool in a successful grazing management program. This article describes the process of establishing an effective rangeland management and monitoring system.

Dustin Johnson | Feb 2020 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article