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Raised Bed Gardening

Gardening in raised beds has been a common practice for centuries. "Raised" means the soil level in the bed is higher than its surrounding, and "bed" implies it is small enough to work from the walkways.

May 2018 | Fact Sheet

Growing Your Own

This publication provides basic advice on a wide range of gardening topics, including composting, container gardens, fall/winter gardens, fertilizing, insect pests, plant diseases, planting guidelines, raised beds, site selection, slugs, ...

Gail Langellotto | Apr 2011 | OSU Extension Catalog

Are madrone trees mean?

Q: I have a small grove of Madrones behind my house. I have put a couple of annual beds under them but nothing seems to grow under them. I have looked all over the net to no avail on this issue. I did amend the ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

I need a cat-free garden, is there a natural deterrent?

Q: My daughter's cat digs in my flower bed and leaves holes and scatters dirt everywhere, uproots bulbs, etc. What can I use that is a natural remedy, something safe for the environment.

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Shady Wedding, Master Gardener to the Rescue!

Q: I need to plant something now for a summer wedding next year, my yard is shaded. Help!

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article

Encourage kids to explore imagination in the garden

Digging in the dirt gives youth a feeling of accomplishment

Kym Pokorny | Apr 22, 2016 | News Story

What’s Wrong With My Madrone?

This article briefly discusses the most prevalent madrone disease problems, then offers a broader perspective on the health of this southern Oregon native.

Max Bennett, Dave Shaw | Nov 2006 | Article

Landscaping with Roses

Selecting roses for landscape use may seem like an impossible task, but with a few key elements in mind, you can select a rose or a group of roses to complement your new or current landscape.

Barbara McMullen | May 2007 | Article