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Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results.

Composting at Winter Green Farm Improves Soil Health and Protects Water Quality

In 1980 Jack Gray and Mary Jo Wade started Winter Green Farm just 20 miles west of Eugene, five years later Wali and Jabrila Via joined them and in 2009 long-time employees Chris Overbaugh and Shannon Shipp-Overbaugh also ...

Nick Andrews | Jul 2013 | Article

Management Strategies for Dealing with Select Poisonous Plants in Oregon

Rangeland, pastures and hay fields throughout Oregon often contain poisonous plants that are potentially dangerous to cattle and other livestock.

Andy Hulting, Karin Neff | Sep 2019 | Publication

How to grow currants and gooseberries for jams and pies

Currants and gooseberries make great jams and pies

Dec 31, 2010 | News Story

How blueberry plants develop and grow

Blueberries grow well in the Pacific Northwest. To get the most out of your bushes, it helps to understand the form and function of each part of the plant.

Bernadine Strik | Mar 2015 | Article

Avoiding poisonous plants in pasture and hay

How to identify, manage, and avoid poisonous plants in your pasture.

Shelby Filley | Apr 2012 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article

How to Remove Poison Oak Plants and Treat a Rash

Poison oak plants contain a chemical that causes a severe rash. Learn how to spot a plant, safely remove, and clean your clothes, gear and skin afterward to prevent a rash.

Jun 2010 | Article

Management strategies for dealing with select poisonous plants in Oregon.

Rangeland, pastures and hay fields throughout Oregon often contain poisonous plants that are potentially dangerous to cattle and other livestock.

Andy Hulting, Karin Neff | Sep 2019 | Article