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Instead of leaving soil naked, coat it with cover crops

Grow "green manure" to keep soil from eroding, weeds from exploding and to add nutrients.

Kym Pokorny | Jul 27, 2018 | News Story

Are madrone trees mean?

Q: I have a small grove of Madrones behind my house. I have put a couple of annual beds under them but nothing seems to grow under them. I have looked all over the net to no avail on this issue. I did amend the soil in the beds. I also planted a few Dogwood trees under them from tiny sticks. The trees grew last summer but then the leaves started browning at the tips and curling up. I was watering the trees every two to three days during summer. What am I doing wrong?

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What kind of ground cover crop should I plant?

Q: I have a small garden plot that I have let go fallow over the summer, but would like to plant something to keep the weeds down until next year. Most of the cover crops I read about look a lot like the invasive weeds I'm always pulling! What should I plant that can be easily tilled into the soil for planting next spring?

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Native groundcovers are great for home landscapes

Try native groundcovers for home landscapes.

Mar 25, 2011 | News Story

Native madrones are special to the Northwest

There are probably few plants that are more strongly identified with this area or are held in greater affection than the madrone tree.

Jan 27, 2006 | News Story

Is there a "no mow" lawn in my future?

Q: My so-called lawn needs help -- it consists of clumps of grass with bare spots between, My small yard is completely fenced with a large apple tree shading much of it, so the grass gets at most 3 to 4 hours of sun a day. What do you think of "no mow" creeping red fescue? Would I have to have the existing grass rototilled, or could topsoil be brought in and the fescue planted (by seed?) in the bare spots to fill in over time as it grows?

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Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article

What’s Wrong With My Madrone?

This article briefly discusses the most prevalent madrone disease problems, then offers a broader perspective on the health of this southern Oregon native.

Max Bennett, Dave Shaw | Nov 2006 | Article