Search OSU Extension

Showing 1 - 8 of 8 results.

Forages - hay and pasture collection

This collection has information on soil testing and ferilizing, renovation. forage management , hay, irrigation, feeding values, forage types, forage anti-quality factors, leasing pastures and more.

Shelby Filley | Aug 2019 | Collection

Are madrone trees mean?

Q: I have a small grove of Madrones behind my house. I have put a couple of annual beds under them but nothing seems to grow under them. I have looked all over the net to no avail on this issue. I did amend the soil in the beds. I also planted a few Dogwood trees under them from tiny sticks. The trees grew last summer but then the leaves started browning at the tips and curling up. I was watering the trees every two to three days during summer. What am I doing wrong?

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Hey, how much hay?

Q: How many bales of grass hay per acre from the average pasture?

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Native madrones are special to the Northwest

There are probably few plants that are more strongly identified with this area or are held in greater affection than the madrone tree.

Jan 27, 2006 | News Story

Fertilizing For Hay Production

Forages and all green plants require moisture, nutrients, heat, and light for growth. To make hay, you need good nutrition to maximize on productivity and quality of the final product. You might want to treat hay fields and pasture fields differently in terms of when you apply fertilizers especially nitrogen even when soil test results are the same. To see how this works ...

Sam Angima | Mar 2007 | Article

Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article

What’s Wrong With My Madrone?

This article briefly discusses the most prevalent madrone disease problems, then offers a broader perspective on the health of this southern Oregon native.

Max Bennett, Dave Shaw | Nov 2006 | Article

Western Oregon Hay

Because of our typically wet springs in western Oregon, the average hay crop usually ends up being of low quality. However, when forage in the field is young and tender it is of high quality. As the forage matures, it becomes higher in quantity, but lower in nutritive value (low protein and energy, low digestibility, high fiber). But, when we should cut the hay for ...

Shelby Filley | May 2013 | Article