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Forages - hay and pasture collection

This collection has information on soil testing and ferilizing, renovation. forage management , hay, irrigation, feeding values, forage types, forage anti-quality factors, leasing pastures and more.

Shelby Filley | Aug 2019 | Collection

What should I be doing now for weed control?

Q: The straw mulch I used at the end of summer to suppress the weeds doesn't seem to be working. Should I till it and cover with plastic? black or clear? Is there something better. Or should I add more straw. I could probably bring some cardboard home from work. Is this a healthy option?

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Hey, how much hay?

Q: How many bales of grass hay per acre from the average pasture?

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Fertilizing For Hay Production

Forages and all green plants require moisture, nutrients, heat, and light for growth. To make hay, you need good nutrition to maximize on productivity and quality of the final product. You might want to treat hay fields and ...

Sam Angima | Mar 2007 | Article

Western Oregon Hay

Because of our typically wet springs in western Oregon, the average hay crop usually ends up being of low quality. However, when forage in the field is young and tender it is of high quality. As the forage matures, it ...

Shelby Filley | May 2013 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article

How to Remove Poison Oak Plants and Treat a Rash

Poison oak plants contain a chemical that causes a severe rash. Learn how to spot a plant, safely remove, and clean your clothes, gear and skin afterward to prevent a rash.

Jun 2010 | Article

Tansy Ragwort

Tansy ragwort, an invasive weed that can harm certain types of livestock, is making a comeback in western Oregon. Find out how to control it and protect your animals.

Shelby Filley, Andy Hulting, Gene Pirelli, Eric Coombs | Aug 2011 | Article