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Herbicide carryover in hay, manure, compost and grass clippings

Herbicides applied to pastures and some crops can persist in soil amendments like hay, manure, compost and grass clippings. Make sure your amendments are free of these herbicides before you contaminate your soil.

Mar 2010 | Article

Turfgrasses and Lawn Care in Eastern Oregon

Today, turfgrass is the single largest irrigated crop in the United States and covers three times the land area of any other cultivated crop. An estimated 40.5 million acres of grasses are planted in residential, commercial and...

Richard Smiley | Jan 2018 | Article

Will glyphosate poison us or our pets?

Q: We live in a large condominium between NW Naito Parkway and the Willamette River. Our property extends to the banks of the river. Our landscaper has been using a diluted version of glyphosate to control weeds on the ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Growing vegetables in the Pacific Northwest coastal region

Asparagus, beets, carrots and summer squash are some of the vegetables you can grow along the coast. Learn what to watch out for in a region known for cooler temperatures.

Sally Reill | Jul 2017 | Article

Weed management for blueberry fields in the Pacific Northwest

Weeds are always a difficult problem in blueberry production! They start to show up shortly after transplanting, and tend to become more problematic as time goes on. There are, however, strategies that help to control weeds in...

Tim Miller | Mar 2015 | Article

Pacific NW Native Plants by Plant Community

Useful information about Western Hemlock-Douglas Fir Forest, Prairie, Scrub-Shrub Wetlands, and Mixed Deciduous Forest/Steep Dry Slope.

Lisa Albert | Jun 2014 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article