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Methods to control blackberry thickets

It could take years to eradicate a large patch of blackberries, because so many seeds remain in the soil. But with good timing and dedication, property owners can reduce a sprawling blackberry thicket to a few manageable stragglers

Mar 26, 2010 | News Story

Shade tree wanted, what, when and how should I plant?

Q: Hello, I live in Bend and have a south-facing back yard that really heats up in the sun. I'd like to plant a tree that will provide a canopy of shade and prefer deciduous for this purpose. Can you suggest one or more that will do well here?  

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Are roadside blackberries safe?

Q: I live next to highway twenty, and perhaps because no one wants to pick on the side of a busy road, but that's where I find the biggest blackberries in town. However, I think the Department of Transportation may spray ...

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They get knocked down but they get up again, are blackberries indestructible?

Q: I have chopped down blackberry canes into fairly small pieces in my back yard, The area is a fair size. Can I leave them on the ground, or can these pieces of cane resprout. I'm not interested in using any kind of ...

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Spikeweed

Can spraying this weed at the right time keep it out of our fields?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

The age old secret to tree planting is...

Green Side up and brown side down. Seriously, it is that easy! But, just in case you are a detail oriented person here are a few extra things to consider while getting those roots in the ground.

Lauren Grand | Nov 2018 | Article

Monitoring Grazing Lands in Oregon

Rangeland monitoring represents a critical tool in a successful grazing management program. This article describes the process of establishing an effective rangeland management and monitoring system.

Dustin Johnson | Feb 2020 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article

Range improvements: tools and methods to improve cattle distribution

Uneven grazing distribution patterns on rangeland can lead to overuse of forage in some areas and no use or waste of herbage in areas not visited by cattle. Range improvements affecting more even distribution of grazing ...

David Ganskopp | Jan 2019 | Article