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Rhubarb

Fertilizers, Hothouse Forcing, Harvesting, Handling, Storage, Pest Control

Aug 2004 | Article

Management Strategies for Dealing with Select Poisonous Plants in Oregon

Rangeland, pastures and hay fields throughout Oregon often contain poisonous plants that are potentially dangerous to cattle and other livestock.

Andy Hulting, Karin Neff | Sep 2019 | Publication

Central Oregon Vegetable Gardening

A collection of articles for growing vegetables in Central Oregon. Include general information, recommendations, soil temperatures, rhubarb, potatoes, cucumbers, beets, carrots, radishes, onions, tomatoes and tomatillos.

Jul 2018 | Collection

Soluble salts damaging to houseplants

Check winter houseplants for brown leaf tips, wilting, dropping of lower leaves and little or no new growth - all signs that your plant may be in trouble.

Feb 19, 2003 | News Story

The age old secret to tree planting is...

Green Side up and brown side down. Seriously, it is that easy! But, just in case you are a detail oriented person here are a few extra things to consider while getting those roots in the ground.

Lauren Grand | Nov 2018 | Article

Head off houseplant pests with vigilance and cleanliness

Be sure to ID insects first before choosing a method for control

Kym Pokorny | Nov 17, 2017 | News Story

Get indoor pests to bug off without chemicals

Winter is a good time to check for insects on your houseplants

Kym Pokorny | Nov 20, 2015 | News Story

Give charming winter-blooming plants as holiday gifts

A few tips will assure plants live into the new year

Kym Pokorny | Nov 29, 2017 | News Story

Avoiding poisonous plants in pasture and hay

How to identify, manage, and avoid poisonous plants in your pasture.

Shelby Filley | Apr 2012 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article