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Using soil type to estimate potential forage productivity

Knowing yield can help you make informed management decisions. You can estimate potential yield from past history of the field, neighboring fields of similar type, averages for specific forages, and from soils information.

Shelby Filley | Aug 2018 | Article

Turfgrasses and Lawn Care in Eastern Oregon

Today, turfgrass is the single largest irrigated crop in the United States and covers three times the land area of any other cultivated crop. An estimated 40.5 million acres of grasses are planted in residential, commercial and...

Richard Smiley | Jan 2018 | Article

Are madrone trees mean?

Q: I have a small grove of Madrones behind my house. I have put a couple of annual beds under them but nothing seems to grow under them. I have looked all over the net to no avail on this issue. I did amend the ...

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Symphylans have invaded my garden, how can I get rid of them?

Q: How do i get rid of symphylans? I have turned the dirt numerous times and treated with Bifenthrin as was directed by a soil expert at a local greenhouse ( 3 days ago) and they're still alive and well. Help!!! I am ...

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Native madrones are special to the Northwest

There are probably few plants that are more strongly identified with this area or are held in greater affection than the madrone tree.

Jan 27, 2006 | News Story

Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article

What’s Wrong With My Madrone?

This article briefly discusses the most prevalent madrone disease problems, then offers a broader perspective on the health of this southern Oregon native.

Max Bennett, Dave Shaw | Nov 2006 | Article

Insecticide Screening for Effectiveness in Controlling Thrips in Dry Bulb Onions

Controlling thrips (onion and western flower) is becoming increasingly difficult for commercial onion growers in the Treasure Valley. One of the problems is resistance to some of the commonly used insecticides. The objective of ...

Lynn Jensen | Jul 2010 | Article