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Showing 1 - 10 of 11 results.

Red worms eat their way through kitchen waste to produce rich soil amendment

Keeping a worm farm is an easy project

Kym Pokorny | Aug 12, 2016 | News Story

Wiggle your way into worm composting

Worm castings -- AKA poop -- add valuable nutrients to the soil and is easy to make. The hardest part is making the bin and that's not difficult.

Kym Pokorny | Jul 23, 2018 | News Story

Sheet mulching — aka lasagna composting — builds soil, saves time

Sheet composting, also referred to as lasagna composting or sheet mulching, is a cold composting method used by people around the world for generations. It is an excellent way to convert grass to vegetable beds, create new ...

Jan 2013 | Article

Three methods for no-turn cold composting

Recycling organic debris for composting and improving soil doesn’t have to be a chore! If hot composting is not for you, try one of these easy cold-composting methods. Each has advantages and disadvantages but the end result is the same: improved garden soil and less organic waste in landfill.

Jul 2017 | Article

I gotta have more worms!

Q: Where can I find information on adding worms to soil that has none? Thanks.

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Spikeweed

Can spraying this weed at the right time keep it out of our fields?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Fewer weeds equals more quality forage

Weeds can lower the quality and quantity of forage in a pasture or hayfield. In general, weeds have lower protein and energy than improved, cool season perennial and annual forages under good grazing management. The palatability...

Shelby Filley | Sep 2012 | Article

Velvetleaf-Have You Seen This Weed?

This small plant causes extensive crop loss. Is it still missing?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Composting with worms

Information about how to use worms to compost.

Dec 2017 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article