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Herbicide Carryover in Hay, Manure, Compost, and Grass Clippings

Many farmers and home gardeners have  reported damage to vegetable and flower crops after applying horse or livestock manure, compost, hay, and grass clippings to the soil. The symptoms reported include poor seed germination; death of young plants; twisted, cupped, and elongated leaves; misshapen fruit; and reduced yields. These symptoms can be caused by other factors, including...

Mar 2010 | Article

Food Safety for Fresh Market Growers: Manure Management and Irrigation Water

Many farms will be required to go through some sort of Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) certification process in order to satisfy buyer demands or because they will be required to under the new Food Safety Modernization Act. Recent outbreaks of food borne illnesses that have been traced to relatively small scale farms show that no fresh market growers are immune to ensure ...

Nick Andrews | Jun 2013 | Article

Solid Manure Spreader Wagon Calibration Checklist

A printable checklist for calibrating a solid manure spreader wagon.

Aug 2018 | Fact Sheet

Mud and Manure Management Resources for Small Farms

Publications and documents demonstrating the art of Mud and Manure Management for the pastures and forage crop. These contain useful information that are important when managing and producing livestock on pasture.

Mar 2018 | Collection

Are madrone trees mean?

Q: I have a small grove of Madrones behind my house. I have put a couple of annual beds under them but nothing seems to grow under them. I have looked all over the net to no avail on this issue. I did amend the soil in the beds. I also planted a few Dogwood trees under them from tiny sticks. The trees grew last summer but then the leaves started browning at the tips and curling up. I was watering the trees every two to three days during summer. What am I doing wrong?

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Native madrones are special to the Northwest

There are probably few plants that are more strongly identified with this area or are held in greater affection than the madrone tree.

Jan 27, 2006 | News Story

Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article