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Using soil type to estimate potential forage productivity

Knowing yield can help you make informed management decisions. You can estimate potential yield from past history of the field, neighboring fields of similar type, averages for specific forages, and from soils information.

Shelby Filley | Aug 2018 | Article

Are madrone trees mean?

Q: I have a small grove of Madrones behind my house. I have put a couple of annual beds under them but nothing seems to grow under them. I have looked all over the net to no avail on this issue. I did amend the ...

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Growing Walnuts in Oregon

Designed for both commercial and home growers. Explains how to determine whether the soil is appropriate for planting walnut trees. Covers different types of walnuts, including Franquette, Spurgeon, Hartley, Manregian, Carpathian, and ...

Mar 2006 | OSU Extension Catalog

What's a pet-safe way to kill moss in my lawn?

Q: My lawn has been taken over by moss this winter, and I am wondering if there is a pet-safe moss killer on the market that won't kill my grass also? I have read your materials on moss control, and I plan to utilize ...

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What’s That Moss Doing In My Pasture?

It's that time of year when we notice, in some cases, more moss than grass growing in our pastures. What went wrong? How can the problem be fixed? Most folks want to know what they can do to get rid of the moss, ...

Melissa Fery | Mar 2007 | Article

Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article

What’s Wrong With My Madrone?

This article briefly discusses the most prevalent madrone disease problems, then offers a broader perspective on the health of this southern Oregon native.

Max Bennett, Dave Shaw | Nov 2006 | Article

Native madrones are special to the Northwest

There are probably few plants that are more strongly identified with this area or are held in greater affection than the madrone tree.

Jan 27, 2006 | News Story