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Predicting Nitrogen Availability from Organic Amendments: laboratory, Field, and Computer Stimulation

A study to improve the ability to predict nitrogen availability from organic soil amendments, including improved accuracy of Nitrogen availability estimates, to target amendment application rates to meet crop N needs.

Dan Sullivan, E.S. Gale, Delbert Hemphill, Craig Crogger, Andy Bary, E.A. Myhre | Apr 2018 | Publication

Infiltration Testing: Low-impact development fact sheet

One of the first steps in siting a low-impact development facility is infiltration testing. Infiltration tests estimate the rate at which runoff will infiltrate, or pass through, native soil. An infiltration test, in essence, ...

Derek Godwin | Aug 2018 | OSU Extension Catalog

Are madrone trees mean?

Q: I have a small grove of Madrones behind my house. I have put a couple of annual beds under them but nothing seems to grow under them. I have looked all over the net to no avail on this issue. I did amend the ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article

What’s Wrong With My Madrone?

This article briefly discusses the most prevalent madrone disease problems, then offers a broader perspective on the health of this southern Oregon native.

Max Bennett, Dave Shaw | Nov 2006 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Native madrones are special to the Northwest

There are probably few plants that are more strongly identified with this area or are held in greater affection than the madrone tree.

Jan 27, 2006 | News Story

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article