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Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results.

Living on the Land: Managing Manure

This publication is part of the Living on the Land series. It provides concise information on the basics of livestock manure management, including handling, storage, composting, use, and ways to reduce negative effects on the ...

Brian Tuck | Apr 2011 | OSU Extension Catalog

Using soil type to estimate potential forage productivity

Knowing yield can help you make informed management decisions. You can estimate potential yield from past history of the field, neighboring fields of similar type, averages for specific forages, and from soils information.

Shelby Filley | Aug 2018 | Article

Composting: An Alternative for Livestock Manure Management and Disposal of Dead Animals

This publication compares composted and uncomposted manure; explains the composting process; describes equipment and strategies for composting; and lists uses, advantages, and drawbacks of compost. Discusses regulations, and briefly mentions methods for composting animal carcasses.

May 2012 | OSU Extension Catalog

Homemade Remedies for Pests and Diseases

Home remedies have shown some effectiveness against many garden pests and diseases.

Jul 2017 | Article

Blueberry bacterial and fungal diseases

Pacific Northwest blueberry growers must identify and control a number of bacterial and fungal diseases in order to ensure the highest yields. Fortunately, only a few of the diseases that occur on highbush blueberry in this region cause significant losses when left unchecked.

Jay Pscheidt, Jerry Weiland | Mar 2015 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article