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Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results.

Strip-tillage for Onions and Sweet Corn, Lorin Grigg (Farmer-to-Farmer Case Study Series)

Lorin Grigg grows onions and sweet corn under sprinkler irrigation in Quincy, Washington. In this publication, Grigg discusses his strategy for cover cropping to protect seedlings from windblown sand and reduce wind erosion.

Jun 2018 | OSU Extension Catalog

Monitoring Vineyard Nutrition

This article describes how to determine vineyard nutrient needs through tissue and soil sampling.

Patricia Skinkis, Paul Schreiner | Dec 2018 | Article

How to establish a wine grape vineyard

While the type of soil is important, location takes precedence when starting a vineyard for wine production.

Patricia Skinkis | Sep 2018 | Article

Using Strip Tillage in Vegetable Production Systems in Western Oregon

Discusses results of on-farm research conducted in the Willamette Valley from 1996 to 2001 to compare strip tillage with conventional tillage systems. More than 30 large-scale field trials were conducted on a variety of soils and...

Feb 2003 | OSU Extension Catalog

Management of grapevine water status under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions

Information on vineyard water management, focusing on when to initiate irrigation.

Alexander Levin | Oct 2018 | Article

What's the difference between chemical, organic fertilizers?

Differences between processed and organic fertilizers are explained in this article.

May 14, 2004 | News Story

Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article

Wine grape tissue nutrient analysis guidelines for Oregon

This is a guide that can be used by wine grape growers to interpret their vine tissue nutrient analysis results to determine nutrient sufficiency, deficiency or excess.

Paul Schreiner | May 2019 | Article

Blueberry bacterial and fungal diseases

Pacific Northwest blueberry growers must identify and control a number of bacterial and fungal diseases in order to ensure the highest yields. Fortunately, only a few of the diseases that occur on highbush blueberry in this region cause significant losses when left unchecked.

Jay Pscheidt, Jerry Weiland | Mar 2015 | Article