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Burkholderia bacteria -- good, bad or both?

A species of bacterium common in soil and water called "Burkholderia cepacia" (B. cepacia) is being championed by agricultural scientists as a non-chemical means of fighting plant infections.

Feb 19, 2003 | News Story

Pythium

This pest stunts the growth and maturation or cereal grains.

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Cephalosporium Stripe

Winter cereals and grasses in danger of contracting disease.

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Take All

This root rot look-alike is endangering wheat, grass, and barley. Learn the signs, symptoms, and controls of this disease.

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Sawflies

Will Oregon meet these wasp-like pests again?

Mary Corp | May 2003 | Article

Scouting and collecting Wheat Head Armyworms

What growers can do to scout for and help identify wheathead armyworms.

Mary Corp | Oct 2008 | Article

Fruit tree pest management

Homeowners often consider pest management the most difficult part of raising fruit. Most people either lack the knowledge to identify and control insect pests and diseases, or they dread having to spray chemicals to protect their...

Steve Renquist | May 2015 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article