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Monitoring Vineyard Nutrition

This article describes how to determine vineyard nutrient needs through tissue and soil sampling.

Patricia Skinkis, Paul Schreiner | Dec 2018 | Article

How to establish a wine grape vineyard

While the type of soil is important, location takes precedence when starting a vineyard for wine production.

Patricia Skinkis | Sep 2018 | Article

What should I be doing now for weed control?

Q: The straw mulch I used at the end of summer to suppress the weeds doesn't seem to be working. Should I till it and cover with plastic? black or clear? Is there something better. Or should I add more straw. I could probably bring some cardboard home from work. Is this a healthy option?

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Management of grapevine water status under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions

Information on vineyard water management, focusing on when to initiate irrigation.

Alexander Levin | Oct 2018 | Article

Wine grape tissue nutrient analysis guidelines for Oregon

This is a guide that can be used by wine grape growers to interpret their vine tissue nutrient analysis results to determine nutrient sufficiency, deficiency or excess.

Paul Schreiner | May 2019 | Article

Top Ten Things I Learned Buying a Small Farm

Most recently, my husband and I purchased a small farm in southern Oregon-ten acres in the Applegate Valley, a mixture of pasture, woodland, hills and weeds. We were delighted when we went into escrow and could not wait to...

Melissa Matthewson | Dec 2007 | Article

How blueberry plants develop and grow

Blueberries grow well in the Pacific Northwest. To get the most out of your bushes, it helps to understand the form and function of each part of the plant.

Bernadine Strik | Mar 2015 | Article

Why do I need water rights for irrigation?

Many landowners are unaware that a legal right is needed to use surface water and groundwater for irrigation purposes.

Melissa Fery | Apr 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article

Grapevine Trunk Diseases in Oregon

A summary of the main trunk diseases causing issues in Oregon and management methods.

Melodie Putnam | Mar 2019 | Article