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Showing 1 - 8 of 8 results.

Using soil type to estimate potential forage productivity

Knowing yield can help you make informed management decisions. You can estimate potential yield from past history of the field, neighboring fields of similar type, averages for specific forages, and from soils information.

Shelby Filley | Aug 2018 | Article

Scotch Thistle

Scotch thistle was introduced to the United States in the 1800s as an ornamental plant from the Mediterranean region. It is a noxious weed in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Scotch thistle can form dense, virtually impenetrable ...

Sep 2003 | OSU Extension Catalog

Russian Thistle: Management in a Wheat-Fallow Crop Rotation

Reviews Russian thistle biology as it relates to management, including seed dormancy and longevity in soil, seed distribution, seed germination and emergence, plant growth after establishment, crop competition, and resistance to ...

Aug 2019 | OSU Extension Catalog

Perennial Weed Biology and Management

Explains how simple and creeping perennial weeds reproduce and spread. Covers weed seedbanks, seed dormancy in soil, and factors that influence seed germination. Describes the typical root structure of perennial weeds and the various...

Mar 2001 | OSU Extension Catalog

Homemade Remedies for Pests and Diseases

Home remedies have shown some effectiveness against many garden pests and diseases.

Jul 2017 | Article

Blueberry bacterial and fungal diseases

Pacific Northwest blueberry growers must identify and control a number of bacterial and fungal diseases in order to ensure the highest yields. Fortunately, only a few of the diseases that occur on highbush blueberry in this region cause significant losses when left unchecked.

Jay Pscheidt, Jerry Weiland | Mar 2015 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article