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Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results.

Testing Soil pH

Describing how to test soil in your own home garden.

May 2018 | Educational Document

Soil pH and pasture productivity

A look at the cost effectiveness of liming coastal ryegrass pastures.

Troy Downing | May 2009 | Article

Variety in the Pasture

Forages are a critical part of farming and ranching, and a large variety of grasses and legumes are available for planting in our fields. The more we know about these forages, the better we can choose what we grow and ...

Shelby Filley | Mar 2012 | Article

Coastal Pastures in Oregon and Washington

The coastal regions of Oregon and Washington have different climate and soils than other parts of the states. Rainfall is high, ranging from 70 inches in southern Oregon to more than 100 inches in the coastal mountains. ...

Fred Lundin | Sep 1996 | Article

Turfgrasses and Lawn Care in Eastern Oregon

Today, turfgrass is the single largest irrigated crop in the United States and covers three times the land area of any other cultivated crop. An estimated 40.5 million acres of grasses are planted in residential, commercial and...

Richard Smiley | Jan 2018 | Article

Pacific NW Native Plants by Plant Community

Useful information about Western Hemlock-Douglas Fir Forest, Prairie, Scrub-Shrub Wetlands, and Mixed Deciduous Forest/Steep Dry Slope.

Lisa Albert | Jun 2014 | Article

Pacific Northwest native plants for the woodland garden

Many people think of shade or woodland gardens when they think of growing native plants. In fact, many woodland plants do very well in garden settings. But careful selection and care is essential to making your woodland garden flourish.

Linda R. McMahan | Jun 2010 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article