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Tillage Method and Sowing Rate Relations for Dryland Spring Wheat, Barley, and Oat

Some farmers in the Inland Pacific Northwest have reported lower grain yield of spring cereals with no-till (NT) compared to conservation tillage (CT). A 4-year field study was conducted in a 12-inch annual precipitation zone to determine tillage method and sowing rate effects on seed-zone water, seed-zone temperature, plant stand, grain yield, grain yield components, and straw production for three spring-sown cereal species.

William Schillinger, Donald Wellsandt, Harry Schafer, Steve Schofstoll, Robert Papendick | Nov 2005 | Publication

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on several factors that make it virtually impossible to predict how dangerous the plant is at any given time.

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article