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Poor soil? Build up with raised beds

Framed or mounded, raised beds give plant roots the space they need

Kym Pokorny | Nov 8, 2016 | News Story

Fall Pasture Management: Plant, Root Growth, & Soil Fertility

Proper pasture management is a year round effort. Fall is one of the most critical periods for western Oregon pastures, as well as central and eastern irrigated pastures. Management during the fall affects the ability of pasture plants to over winter, determines when new growth begins in the spring, and how much forage will be produced over the entire season. Overgrazing or...

Melissa Fery | Dec 2009 | Article

Alfalfa soil fertility and fertilization requirements

A productive alfalfa crop removes significant quantities of macronutrients and small amounts of micronutrients from the soil (Table 1). A complete fertilizer program is essential to ensure a highly productive, long-lived stand.

David Hannaway, Mylen Bohle, Daniel Miles, Yitian Lin, Brianna Randow | Sep 2019 | Publication

Grow your own potatoes

An article from 1995 about growing your own potatoes.

Phil Hamm, Alvin Mosley, Oscar Gutbrod, Steven James, Kerry Locke, Lynn Jensen | Mar 1995 | Article

Coastal Pastures in Oregon and Washington

The coastal regions of Oregon and Washington have different climate and soils than other parts of the states. Rainfall is high, ranging from 70 inches in southern Oregon to more than 100 inches in the coastal mountains. Temperature is moderated by the Pacific Ocean resulting in long seasons and mild temperatures. Astoria, Oregon, for example, averages 276 frost-free days and ...

Fred Lundin | Sep 1996 | Article

Raised Bed Gardening

Gardening in raised beds has been a common practice for centuries. "Raised" means the soil level in the bed is higher than its surrounding, and "bed" implies it is small enough to work from the walkways.

May 2018 | Fact Sheet

Raised bed lumber, pressure treated safe?

Q: I am considering using some 2x6 inch material for a small raised bed for strawberries. My first thought was to consider pressure treated lumber, but I have read conflicting articles on the the safety of this product, with the chemicals possibly reaching the plants. Others claim this doesn't happen and the lumber is safe. I would appreciate your opinion on this matter.

A: View answer | View all featured questions