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Coastal Pastures in Oregon and Washington

The coastal regions of Oregon and Washington have different climate and soils than other parts of the states. Rainfall is high, ranging from 70 inches in southern Oregon to more than 100 inches in the coastal mountains. ...

Fred Lundin | Sep 1996 | Article

Russian Thistle: Management in a Wheat-Fallow Crop Rotation

Reviews Russian thistle biology as it relates to management, including seed dormancy and longevity in soil, seed distribution, seed germination and emergence, plant growth after establishment, crop competition, and resistance to ...

Aug 2019 | OSU Extension Catalog

Do you have a green solution to pasture weeds?

Q: I take care of the family pastures (maintain irrigation) and was wondering what is the best way to get rid of weeds in the pastures. We have horse weed and a few others, not real bad but want to stop it and get ...

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Help! Tansy is getting the upper hand.

Q: Where can I get some of the tansy flea beetles ? We used these many years ago and they did an incredible job. I do have some of the cinnabar larva present but they never start working early enough to prevent the ...

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Fewer weeds equals more quality forage

Weeds can lower the quality and quantity of forage in a pasture or hayfield. In general, weeds have lower protein and energy than improved, cool season perennial and annual forages under good grazing management. The palatability...

Shelby Filley | Sep 2012 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article